Author Archives: Corey Pressman (@cspressman)

Corey Pressman (@cspressman)

About Corey Pressman (@cspressman)

Corey is an anthropologist, futurist, author, and speaker. He is busy imagining and enacting our digital future as Director of Experience Strategy at Neologic, a Portland-based agency and imagination lab. A Fellow of the Center for Science and the Imagination at Arizona State University, Corey regularly publishes and presents on the past, present, and future of media. He recently contributed the closing chapter to the book Examining Paratextual Theory and its Applications in Digital Culture.

Ancient Marginalia: Theseus and the Dramaturge

The future is hiring: Digiturge Wanted Publisher seeking experienced digiturge to craft relevant and creative in-line links for backlog titles and new digital-fist works of fiction, nonfiction, and ludic narratives.  Applicants must have an advanced degree in either Library Science or Digital Indexing/Metadata.  Literature degree preferred.  The successful applicant will have a rich multidisciplinary...

Ancient Marginalia: Do the Right Thing

Imagine you’re a hot shot English translator living in Bruges.  It’s 1470.  You and a buddy set up a printing press to print your translation of a history of Troy. It takes off.  You’re on to something – you’re an artist with the means of mass producing your own work. So hot. You move...

The Great Forking Paths of the Wonderworld

As a single-word construction, maybe (may + be) has been around at least since the 15th century.  So has mayhap, a beautiful little word that lost the race to maybe and perhaps.  According to the etymology, the latter’s meaning is more derived from a ‘might happen by chance’ vibe.  Hap was a 13th century...

Ancient Marginalia: Stretchtext Parade

Hypertext allows one to experience content in a somewhat ‘chutes and ladders’ manner.  Any asset in any hypertext experience, be it text, image, video, audio, can serve as a hyperlink, a portal to another asset or set of assets.   A collection of interlinked hypertext documents, then, is a sort of exploratorium – a multidirectional...

Ancient Marginalia: The Watershed Manifesto

01100011 01101111 01101110 01110011 01110100 01100001 01101110 01110100 00100000 01100011 01101000 01100001 01101110 01100111 01100101 00100000 01101001 01110011 00100000 01101000 01100101 01110010 01100101 00100000 01110100 01101111 00100000 01110011 01110100 01100001 01111001 – Neil Peart The arithmetic magicians of old did not know what fire they handled, what heat they hefted, when they considered the...

Ancient Marginalia: Schlepping Electrons

To be human is to schlep.  The physical anatomy of our pelvis, legs, and toes – all very unusual in the primate world – evolved for walking on two feet for long distances on rugged terrain.  This also frees the hands for carrying stuff.  And what hands!  We possess all the marvels of ape...

Ancient Marginalia: Yesterday’s Naysayers

This is an historic day.  Today, the reputable news source The Onion has announced the death of print at the advanced age of 1,803.  The piece reports: “Print, which had for nearly two millennia worked tirelessly to spread knowledge around the globe in the form of books, newspapers, magazines, pamphlets, and numerous other textual...

Ancient Marginalia: The Eternal Ellipses

Print books encourage finality.  Digital reading experiences don’t have to. Scholar Walter Ong, in working out the many significant differences between ancient oral culture and the print culture we inhabit, astutely states that “Print is only comfortable with finality.”  Ong observes that “print encourages a sense of closure; a feeling of finality which has...

Ancient Marginalia: Resurrecting the Multitext

  Reading has always been interactive.  From cuneiform to KF8, there’s a thread of physical interplay between the craftsman, the form, and the reader.  The latter’s role becomes especially rigorous when writing become longer form and more widely distributed and when the tools for marking them up became closer at hand.  It was not...