Five Things You Didn’t Know About Book Apps

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shutterstock_153564329In the past several years, many publishers and digital start-ups have invested in book apps, but few have reported good return on their investments.

That was the traditional thinking in 2012 and 2013, anyway. In 2014, the situation could be different as yet more people have smartphones and tablets and are even more comfortable with buying and engaging with apps.

So, while thinking about your 2014 and 2015 investments, give apps another look. Here’s a list of five myths about apps to get your head back in the game.

More.


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Related: Register for the latest DBW U course on how to create a book app.

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Kids and Ebooks in the UK (Talking New Media)
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Jeremy Greenfield

About Jeremy Greenfield

Jeremy Greenfield is the editorial director of Digital Book World. Opinions presented here are his own. Read more of his work here.

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One thought on “Five Things You Didn’t Know About Book Apps

  1. Interesting to learn that one doesn’t require technical expertise to create a book app. It’s good to see publishers begin to embrace technology, as I believe this is the direction the industry is headed. Obviously there are many ways technology can shape this industry. For instance, the WHY Code http://whycode.com/ is focused on capturing the answers to the fundamental learning questions of a reader, automatically indexing and publishing information from a text in this format. Look at its website to understand how this could follow the book app in being the next big thing for publishers.

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