Announcing DBW Debates: Ebook Subscription Services

[Press Release]

Announcing DBW Debates: Ebook Subscription Services

NEW YORK — May 5, 2014 — The rise of ebook subscription services has been among the most hotly discussed developments in the publishing world of the last two years. The ultimate scope and nature of their impact on the book industry, though, remains very much an open question. Some think they’re bad for publishing and will ultimately fail; others see them as the future of ebook retail. That sounds like a debate, so Digital Book World is going to have it.

Announcing: DBW Debates: Ebook Subscription Services

Modeled after the successful Intelligence Squared U.S. NPR series, Digital Book World will be holding an Oxford-style debate on the possible benefits to publishers, authors and readers of ebook subscription services. This first debate will be sponsored by global ebook distributor ePubDirect. The company’s CEO will also be participating in the debate.

Digital Book World has invited four experts in the field to face off. Arguing for the proposition “The success of ebook subscription services will be good for publishers, authors and readers” are:

— Mark Coker, CEO and founder of self-publishing platform and distributor Smashwords
— Andrew Weinstein, vice president of content acquisition at ebook subscription service Scribd

Arguing against it are:

— Gareth Cuddy, CEO of ebook distributor ePubDirect
— Jonathan Blum, a journalist who has written compellingly on the subject for The Street

Moderating the debate will be Digital Book World editorial director Jeremy Greenfield.

The debate will be broadcast live on the Web via webcast and will be free to attend. Those interested can register here.

“Digital Book World is at the center of so many debates in publishing and our readers and conference attendees look to us to moderate these discussions of important issues,” said Group Publisher Gary Lynch.

The debate will have three rounds in which the debaters will be able to make their arguments:

1. Opening statements: Each debater will be given a set amount of time to make an initial argument
2. Open debate: Debaters will be challenged on their positions with questions from the moderator and the audience
3. Closing statements: Each debater will be given a set amount of time to make a final argument

Those who attend the debate via live webcast will have an opportunity to vote on whether they are for the statement, against the statement or undecided. They will vote again at the end of the debate. The team that argued best and changed the most minds will be declared the winner.
Title: DBW Debates: Ebook Subscription Services
Date: June 11, 2014
Time: 12-1pm EST (1 hour)
Cost: Free

Register here. 

About Digital Book World

Owned and operated by F+W, A Content + eCommerce Company, (www.fwmedia.com) Digital Book World has grown from an annual conference (The Digital Book World Conference + Expo) launched in 2010 to a year-round membership-driven community, focusing on educational and networking resources and events for consumer publishing professionals and their partners, including agents, booksellers and technology vendors. In partnership with select industry consultants, the Community also offers a platform of services for small and mid-sized publishers to help them navigate the digital transition.

Sponsor:

epubdirect logo

2 thoughts on “Announcing DBW Debates: Ebook Subscription Services

  1. Felipe Adan Lerma

    I’ve been telling folk about this upcoming debate and figured I should chime in on the comments (they’re showing up in italics, so not sure if this will be online that way).

    As a reader and a writer, I obviously have a lot of interest in this.

    People I respect (Joe Konrath) feel it’s unsustainable (via comment to me on one of his posts.)

    Articles I agree with, (Why Netflix Or Spotify For Ebooks Will Work, http://www.forbes.com/sites/jeremygreenfield/2013/10/29/why-netflix-or-spotify-for-ebooks-will-work/ )

    Preliminary available data (views, only on Scribd) say I’m on more peoples’ radar. Lack of sales and view-data breakdown make me question the value of those views.

    So I’ve much to gain from a fully spirited open debate on this issue.

    I hope the debate will also be recorded and available afterwards for any of us unable to listen in live.

    Thanks so much for offering this debate.

    Reply
  2. adanlerma

    I’ve been telling folk about this upcoming debate and figured I should chime in on the comments.

    As a reader and a writer, I obviously have a lot of interest in this.

    People I respect (Joe Konrath) feel it’s unsustainable (via comment to me on one of his posts.)

    Articles I agree with, (Why Netflix Or Spotify For Ebooks Will Work, http://www.forbes.com/sites/jeremygreenfield/2013/10/29/why-netflix-or-spotify-for-ebooks-will-work/ )

    Preliminary available data (views, only on Scribd) say I’m on more peoples’ radar. Lack of sales and view-data breakdown make me question the value of those views.

    So I’ve much to gain from a fully spirited open debate on this issue.

    I hope the debate will also be recorded and available afterwards for any of us unable to listen in live.

    Thanks so much for offering this debate.

    Reply

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