DBW Weekly Roundup: 6/18/10

DBW News RoundupDigital Book World presents a weekly round-up of some of the most interesting news, commentary and tweets related to publishing that you may have missed, from all over the digital book world:

BN’s E-Book Market Share Grows Under New CEO

  • Barnes & Noble’s new CEO William Lynch is making rapid headway for Barnes & Noble in the e-book market. According to Crains New York, Williams has increased BN.com’s share in e-books by nearly 20%, making it a distant second to dominant player Amazon.com…”Publishers absolutely want us to succeed,” Mr. Lynch told Crains New York. “That’s driving their cooperation with us in the digital world.”

IA send to kindle

  • The Internet Archive’s OpenLibrary has enabled new “send to kindle” functionality for many of our public domain texts. This service, developed in partnership with Amazon, enables Kindle owners to download any of the thousands of books on OpenLibrary that are available in the Kindle format (transmission fees may apply). Selecting the “Send to Kindle” link will trigger a redirect to Amazon to provide authorization (if not currently logged in) and information about downloading the book to the user’s Kindle. The Internet Archive is delighted to share the world’s public domain literature with one of the largest ebook reading platforms on the planet.

Apple’s Censorship: Bad for Customers, Worse for Bottom Line

  • In the past week, Apple tried the same gambit with Ulysses Seen, a webcomic version of James Joyce’s classic novel Ulysses featuring too much nudity for the company’s taste, and an app edition of Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest, which pixillated a series of panels featuring two men kissing. Both bans were reversed after considerable media outcry. (As if Joyce and Wilde haven’t had to deal with enough censorship issues, already!) Apple is, naturally, welcome to restrict the type of content that is available on its devices. And yet, as TechCrunch reported Tuesday morning, Apple can’t even keep its guidelines straight. Otherwise how would English tabloid The Sun’s iPad app, featuring Page Three Girls in all their topless glory, get through without incident? As InfoWorld’s Galen Grunman said, “quality control over apps, such as to prevent crashes and to ensure the software does what it promises, is one thing. Control over content and thought is quite another.”

BOOM!’s Chip Mosher discusses their digital distribution plans

  • BOOM! really sees the digital comics market as its own animal. We were one of the first companies to have comics on the iPhone with iVerse back when they launched and have been watching the market place for a couple of years now. Having a consistent release schedule is important for that market segment, and what we are seeing is that the people who are reading digital comics are far and away removed from the rhythms of the direct market. A ton of what the release schedule depends on has to do with administrative things that are out of our control. Currently we have no plans on doing anything earlier than 30 days.

Brands need friends and an eco-system that attracts them

  • These companies do it through their physical environments, interactions in social media, products and innovations, even their content and advice. What they all have in common is this: the experiences they create, digitally and otherwise, are mutually beneficial. They give their community as much as they hope to get back in the form of sales and business: Panera with its community involvement; Zappos with constant engagement and its knack for delighting; Apple with its one-to-one classes; and AMEX with it’s customer service. (If you’ve ever tried contesting a charge or fee with CitiBank or Chase versus American Express, you know what I mean.)

Coffee ‘n Email

  • Key findings of the research include the fact that 93% of U.S. consumers subscribe to email marketing messages and 42% of U.S. online consumers use Facebook at least once a day. 68% of daily Twitter users follow at least one brand, yet only 7% of U.S. consumers participate on Twitter with that frequency.

Tweet of the Week

DBW Tweet of the Week

That’s just a taste of what you may have missed this week. To stay on top of the most interesting news, commentary and tweets related to publishing, keep in touch via our RSS feed, follow us on Twitter, and join your publishing colleagues in our LinkedIn group, or connect with the broader DBW Network.

Apple’s Censorship: Bad for Customers, Worse for Bottom Line

In the past week, Apple tried the same gambit with Ulysses Seen, a webcomic version of James Joyce’s classic novel Ulysses featuring too much nudity for the company’s taste, and an app edition of Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest, which pixillated a series of panels featuring two men kissing. Both bans were reversed after considerable media outcry. (As if Joyce and Wilde haven’t had to deal with enough censorship issues, already!)

Apple is, naturally, welcome to restrict the type of content that is available on its devices. And yet, as TechCrunch reported Tuesday morning, Apple can’t even keep its guidelines straight. Otherwise how would English tabloid The Sun’s iPad app, featuring Page Three Girls in all their topless glory, get through without incident? As InfoWorld’s Galen Grunman said, “quality control over apps, such as to prevent crashes and to ensure the software does what it promises, is one thing. Control over content and thought is quite another.”

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